Holloway Classics

Alice in Wonderland

by Lewis Carroll
A fully illustrated edition of the beloved children’s classic, the story of a young girl named Alice who falls through a rabbit hole into a world of eccentric creatures, nonsense, and rhyme.
Originally published by Macmillan in 1865
Project GutenbergDigital text (Doubleday Page & Co, 1907)
Arthur RackhamIllustrations (Doubleday Page & Co, 1907)
WikipediaImages
Rachel JepsenDigital Production
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The Details
Length: 100 pages
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-952120-07-7

About the Author

Lewis Carroll
Lewis Carroll, born Charles Dodgson in Cheshire, England in 1832, was a children’s writer, a photographer, sometime inventor, and serious mathematician. Dodgson lived most of his life at Christ Church, Oxford, first as a talented student and then as a lecturer in mathematics, in a position he held for nearly three decades. Raised in a conservative high-church Anglican family, Dodgson was ordained a deacon in the Anglican church in 1861. His life was marked by childhood sadness, painful migraines, and an apparent aversion to fame, which he achieved under his pen name, Carroll, upon the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in 1865. With remarkable illustrations by Sir John Tenniel, Alice in Wonderland, as it is often known, was enormously successful, and the author avoided fans and the public, though he continued to write and publish, including nonsense poetry and a second book for Alice, Through the Looking Glass. In addition to this writing and his ongoing work as a mathematician, Dodgson was also an accomplished photographer in the early years of the new technology. His portraits of children are both haunting and celebratory; later in his career he photographed famous writers, artists, and scientists. While the legacy of his work is apparent, continued studies of Dodgson’s somewhat mysterious personal life are often at odds; scholars disagree about Dodgson’s sexuality, particularly whether he had an erotic interest in the young people he often photographed and wrote for. He died of pneumonia at 65, and is memorialized in Westminster Abbey, by a stone at Poets’ Corner. Lewis Carroll societies all over the world continue to study his life and enjoy his work.