Stock Option Scenarios

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Stock Option Scenarios

Common questions covered here
How should I decide when to exercise my options?
How does a cashless exercise work?
What is the benefit of waiting until acquisition to exercise?

The key decisions around stock options are when to exercise and, if you can, when to sell. Here we lay out some common scenarios that might apply to you. Considering these scenarios and their outcomes can help you evaluate your position and decide what you should do.

  • Exercise and hold. You can write the company a check and pay any taxes on the spread. You are then a stockholder, with a stock certificate that may have value in the future. As discussed, you may exercise:

    • Early, even immediately upon grant.

    • Before vesting (if early exercise is available to you).

    • Sometime after vesting.

    • After leaving the company, as long as the exercise window is open.

      • ​caution​ Recall that the window is likely to close soon after you leave a company, often 90 days after termination.
  • Wait until acquisition. If the company is acquired for a large multiple of the exercise price, you may then use your options to buy valuable stock. However, as discussed, your shares could be worth next to nothing unless the sale price exceeds the liquidation overhang.

  • ​caution​ Secondary market. As discussed, in some cases it’s possible to exercise and sell the stock in a private company directly to a private party. But this generally requires some cooperation from the company and is not something you can always count on.

  • Cashless exercise. In the event of an IPO, a broker can allow you to exercise all of your vested options and immediately sell a portion of them into the public market, removing the need for cash up front to exercise and pay taxes.

​important​ Note that some of these scenarios may require significant cash up front, so it makes sense to do the math early. If you are in a tight spot, where you may lose valuable options altogether because you don’t have the cash to exercise, it’s worth exploring each of the scenarios above, or combinations of them, such as exercising and then selling a portion to pay taxes. In addition, there are a few funds and individual investors who may be able to front you the cash to exercise or pay taxes in return for an agreement to share profits.

Author and programmer Alex MacCaw explores a few more detailed scenarios.

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Summary of Dangers

Because of their importance, we’ll wind up with a recap of some of the key dangers we’ve discussed when thinking about equity compensation:

  • ​danger​ When it comes to equity compensation, details matter! You need to understand the type of stock grant or stock option in detail, as well as what it means for your taxes, to know what your equity is worth.

  • ​danger​ Because details are so important, professional advice from a tax advisor or lawyer familiar with equity compensation (or both) is often a good idea. Avoid doing everything yourself, but also avoid blindly trusting advisors without having them explain the details to you in a way you understand.

  • You’re reading a preview of an online book. Buy it now for lifetime access to expert knowledge, including future updates.
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